David Attenborough, 95, makes £1.8million in profit this year

Sir David Attenborough, 95, makes £1.8million in profit as he enjoys one of the most rewarding years of his career

He has just been awarded a ‘Champions of the Earth’ Lifetime Achievement Award, in recognition of his dedication to the natural world and climate change. 

And Sir David Attenborough has also enjoyed one of the most profitable years of his almost seven decade long career. 

The naturalist, 95, who continues to publish books and make TV programmes, has amassed £1.8million in the year to last September.

Icon: Sir David Attenborough, 95, has made £1.8million in profit as he has enjoyed one of the most rewarding years of his career

Newly filed accounts for his business, David Attenborough (Produtions) Ltd, disclose that it’s sitting on a cash pile of £2.8million, up from £1.9million the previous year.

Sir David, who turns 96 next month, has bills to pay – including to the taxman – of £1.3million, giving him a profit of £1.8million for last year.

The shareholders are Sir David, his son Robert and daughter Susan and his wife, Jane, passed away in 1997.

On screen: Accounts for his business  disclose that it’s sitting on a cash pile of £2.8million, up from £1.9million the previous year (Pictured on The Green Planet in January 2022)

Sir David’s career as a broadcaster, natural historian, author, and environmental advocate spans over six decades. 

He is most famous for his work with the BBC’s Natural History Unit, including documentaries such as Life on Earth, the Living Planet, Our Planet and Our Blue Planet.

Last week, Sir David was awarded the ‘Champions of the Earth’ Lifetime Achievement Award by the UN’s Environment Programme (UNEP). 

Success: Last week, Sir David was awarded the ‘Champions of the Earth’ Lifetime Achievement Award by the UN’s Environment Programme (Pictured at a UN conference in November 2021)

The UN Environment Programme’s ‘Champions of the Earth’ honours individuals, groups, and organisations whose actions have had a transformative impact on the environment.

Upon receiving the Lifetime Achievement Award, Sir David urged action to prevent further destruction of the planet.

‘The world has to get together. These problems cannot be solved by one nation – no matter how big that single nation is,’ he said.

‘We know what the problems are and we know how to solve them. All we lack is unified action. 

‘Fifty years ago, whales were on the very edge of extinction worldwide. Then people got together and now there are more whales in the sea than any living human being has ever seen. 

‘If we act together, we can solve these problems.’ 

40 years difference: Upon receiving the Lifetime Achievement Award, Sir David urged action to prevent further destruction of the planet (Pictured in January 2022 on The Green Planet)

The much-loved broadcaster first presented the BBC’s Zoo Quest in 1954, with the initial series filmed in Sierra Leone. 

The naturalist, was pictured meeting the residents of a village, who were amazed when he played back recordings to them. 

The intention of the programme was to film Jack Lester and his fellow zoologist Alfred Woods as they collected animals for London Zoo. 

Throwback: The much-loved broadcaster first presented the BBC’s Zoo Quest in 1954, with the initial series filmed in Sierra Leone (Pictured in the show’s second series in 1956)

Incredible: The naturalist, was pictured meeting the residents of a village, who were amazed when he played back recordings to them (Pictured in 1956)

He then stepped in when Lester fell ill with an unknown tropical illness and passed away from his mysterious ailment in 1956. 

In the show’s second series, in 1956, Sir David, aged 30, was seen shirtless and clutching a bottle of water as he sailed in Borneo in search of the Komodo dragon.

Whilst it was initially believed that the Zoo Quest series’ had been shot in black and white – because that was how they aired on British screens –  it later emerged that they had been filmed in colour.

Whilst it was initially believed that the Zoo Quest series’ had been shot in black and white the BBC unearthed the original colour footage in 2015 (Pictured in 1956)

The original colour footage was discovered by the BBC in 2015 and was shown the following year to mark Sir David’s 90th birthday. 

The places and animals that he encountered were entirely unfamiliar to the Britons watching back in the UK and the show made him a household name.  

Sir David went on to front dozens of nature programmes on the BBC, with his latest project, Prehistoric Planet, set for release next month. 

Today: Sir David went on to front dozens of nature programmes , with his latest project, Prehistoric Planet, set for release next month (Pictured on Dinosaurs: The Final Day in April 2022)

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